Insomnia: review your diet

Insomnia: review your diet
Extract from the article: Insomnia, or lack of sleep, has been linked to a long list of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression. There are a few small adjustments you can make throughout the day for a restful night's sleep. Yasmine San

Insomnia, or lack of sleep, has been linked to a long list of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression. There are a few small adjustments you can make throughout the day for a restful night's sleep. Yasmine Sandrine Zerbo, Nutritionist-Dietician, specialist in the nutritional management of chronic diseases, gives dietary advice on how to sleep well at night.

Diet influences sleep. Studies have shown that diet is closely linked to the sleep mechanism. If you suffer from severe insomnia, it may be due to a poor diet, a poor meal rhythm or even heavy meals, particularly in the evening.

Avoid excitants

Tea, coffee, soft drinks, sweetened beverages, energy drinks and alcoholic beverages are just some of the stimulants that can prevent good sleep. Drinking too much alcohol makes it harder to fall asleep in the first phase of sleep. This can lead to insomnia in the middle of the night. Excessive use of "stimulating" spices such as ginger and mint, or warming spices such as chilli, should also be avoided before bedtime.

Avoid foods with a high glycemic index

Foods with a high glycemic index encourage the overproduction of insulin. The risk of being awakened at night by a food craving is then present. So always opt for low-glycemic index foods in the evening. This will be better for sleep and weight too, since hyperinsulinemia also encourages the storage of what you've eaten as fat.

Eat lightly in the evening

For a better night's sleep, we'll be careful to avoid meals that are too rich or too fatty, which prevent you from falling asleep and promote nocturnal sleep. Instead, opt for light meals in the evening, choosing low-calorie, low-fat foods such as vegetables and fruit, and possibly a few cereals and starches.

Avoid protein-rich dinners

Meals too rich in protein should be avoided in the evening, as they encourage the production of dopamine to the detriment of serotonin. Dopamine promotes alertness and wakefulness, making it harder to fall asleep, while serotonin enables production of the sleep hormone melatonin. Excessive animal protein (meat) at dinner increases digestion time, which can disrupt sleep. For a good night's sleep, opt for protein-rich foods in the morning or at breakfast, and limit protein sources at dinner.

Prefer carbohydrates before sleep

If proteins are to be limited in the evening, as they promote wakefulness, carbohydrates promote the production of serotonin and melatonin, which help you fall asleep and get a deep sleep. For a sleep-inducing dinner, opt for meals with a majority of carbohydrates. Make room for vegetables, fruit and legumes, while keeping your total calorie intake low.

Avoid foods rich in vitamin C

Limit or avoid orange juice, lemons, grapefruit and mandarins before bedtime. Vitamin C can prevent sleep. It depends on the organism. In general, vitamin C is taken in the morning to boost energy. In the evening, the body doesn't need energy; taking vitamin C can cause insomnia. A dose of vitamin C can increase the stimulating effects of dopamine. When the body is sensitive to dopamine, this can disturb sleep.

Avoid eating late at night

However, as skipping a meal is not recommended, if you eat late, a soup filled with vegetables and hot broth is often ideal. A salad for those who don't have digestive problems is also an effective solution. Always eat lightly in the evening.

Preferred foods

Sleep is very good for your health and your heart. So, to lead a healthy lifestyle, it's essential to get enough sleep. Knowing which foods boost sleep is essential for well-being, weight maintenance and much more. Food can help regulate and improve sleep, so you can enjoy more restful nights for better health. Opt for starchy foods (pasta, couscous), warm milk and honey, nuts, legumes, fruit and vegetables. These foods promote serotonin production. They contain magnesium and antioxidants that regulate and balance the nervous system.

Recipe: Diet herbal tea with parsley and honey: 01 bunch of well-washed parsley. One (01) glass of water. Two (02) tablespoons organic honey. Infuse a bunch of parsley in boiling water for 10 minutes. Strain the water without the parsley into a glass. Add two (02) tablespoons of organic honey. Stir well and drink the tea. Drink before going to bed. Parsley and honey tea aids digestion, calms the nerves, gives a good night's sleep and helps the kidneys eliminate toxins. Caution: if you have a blood sugar problem, do not add honey.

William O.            

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sa
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Abel OZIH

Insomnia, or lack of sleep, has been linked to a long list of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression. There are a few small adjustments you can make throughout the day for a restful night's sleep. Yasmine San

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